- USC Digital Folklore Archives - http://folklore.usc.edu -

Recipe

Posted By Mark Winn On March 23, 2011 @ 5:09 am In Foodways,general | Comments Disabled

Original script/version:

Family Chocolate Pie Chocolate Pie

Filling:

¼ lb butter

¾ C sugar

2 eggs

1 t vanilla

1 sq melted unsweetened chocolate

Cream butter and sugar.  Bear in one egg, vanilla and chocolate.  Beat for 5 minutes.  Add second egg and beat 5 more minutes.

Make a pie shell of prepare a frozen pie shell per package directions.  Let shell cool.  Pour filling into cooled pie shell and refrigerate for several hours.

Whip Cream:

Beat whipping cream.  Add powdered sugar and vanilla to taste while whipping.

Spread over pie.  Garnish with grated semi-sweet chocolate.

I have grown up eating the same chocolate pie for every imaginable occasion. Whether it be casual dinners with friends, Christmas, Thanksgiving, or Easter, there would be chocolate pie. It is a recipe was passed into my father’s family long ago, and now every one of my father’s siblings makes the pie for their families as well.

My dad told me he got the recipe from his mom about the time he graduated from college. He said my grandmother had received it from her parents. Although the recipe is not complicated and my mother is a very good cook, it is always my father that makes the pie.

He says, “As you know, every pie comes out a little differently. I have been slightly changing the recipe every time I make it and its fun to see how each pie comes out. About two years ago, my sister Robbin and I came up with the secret to consistently make a good pie. The trick is to let the butter warm up to room temperature before mixing in into the other ingredients.”

It is typical to make several extra pies when going to a friends house so there is one or two to each for dessert, and then we can leave another with our friends. When going to a potluck, our family is always in charge of bringing desert because people like the chocolate pie so much. The receipt has continued to spread as it is now being made by my sister in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.


Article printed from USC Digital Folklore Archives: http://folklore.usc.edu

URL to article: http://folklore.usc.edu/?p=4321