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Folk Art

Posted By Kahniley Sangare On March 15, 2011 @ 10:47 am In general,Material | Comments Disabled

“There are visual images and symbols of the Alpha. There’s a lot of ape stuff, and a lot of Egyptian stuff.”

Subject’s Analysis:

“There’s Egyptian symbolism for (pause) once again, undisclosed reasons. I learned it during initiation, from people who were already in the organization. It’s usually seen on banners and t-shirts and such. It could be on almost anything that has the Alpha Phi Alpha brand name on it. Some of the symbols are for informal purposes, on the collegiate side of things. I think that its fun to be able to identify with different personas or symbols. It’s like a mascot, you know? You embrace it as an image of your organization.”

Collector’s Analysis:

There are a lot of things that the Alpha Phi Alpha symbols are place on. The symbols include an ape, or at times some Egyptian symbols as Jeremiah suggested. However, what is important about the different Alpha Representations is the fact that there are divisions between their professional representations, and their interpersonal/collegiate items. Their collegiate things are worn at get-togethers and during everyday use. The other Alpha symbols are used to symbolize the organization in a more professional and discreet manner.  Directly, below I have shown some representations of the different symbols. Each of the images below is a patch to be worn on clothing. These would be worn on fraternity jackets or other apparel. Many of the Alpha symbols also incorporate the number 1906,which was the year the organization was founded.

[1] [2] [3]

PersonalBuy.com. Blackcollegestuff.com. Mar. 2008. 30 Apr. 2008
<http://personalbuy.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/alpha_patches.html>.


Article printed from USC Digital Folklore Archives: http://folklore.usc.edu

URL to article: http://folklore.usc.edu/?p=3463

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://folklore.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Sangare-01.jpg

[2] Image: http://folklore.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Sangare-02.jpg

[3] Image: http://folklore.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Sangare-03.jpg