Tag Archives: Hawaiian folk belief


Flat Chopsticks

Context: MC is a Vietnamese undergraduate student at USC. She’s currently studying cinematic arts and is my friend. One day when we were hanging out I asked her if she had any beliefs she and her family followed.  YM: So what are some beliefs or superstitious things you and your family follow?  MC: Well a… Continue Reading »

Kalo Farming and Menstruation Superstition

Main Text Subject: There was a superstition. Um…that, like, while we were helping with the kalo fields. Was that, um, anyone, anyone who is menstruating at the moment, couldn’t help. Um…basically like, plow the fields or whatever. Because like, native Hawaiians, they didn’t have as like, strong, as like…um…like gender binary, misogynistic, like, beliefs. But…more… Continue Reading »

Shaka Hand Sign — Hawaiian Legend

Text The following piece was collected during a conversation with a girl who had recently visited Hawaii. We had been discussing the varying uses of the shaka, commonly referred to as the “hang loose” gesture. The girl will hereafter be referred to as the “Informant” and I, the “Collector”. Informant: “So, I was talking to… Continue Reading »

The Menahune Men

Context: The subject is a 19 year old student at USC, her ancestors are Hawaiian and has grown up hearing different stories about Hawaiian culture and old folktales. I asked her to coffee to discuss such things. Piece: Interviewer: “So what’s the first piece of Hawaiian folklore that jumps to your mind?” Subject: “The Menehune… Continue Reading »